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Why You Hate Your Job

You’re dreading the thought of working even one more day at your current position. But have you ever thought about why you hate your job?

Statistically speaking, you hate your job.


According to a Gallup poll, three out of four (77 percent) of U.S. workers hate their jobs and would rather earn a living doing something other than what they currently do for 40+ hours every week.

But unfortunately, finding a new job isn’t easy, especially if your desired position is in a completely different career field. So instead of wallowing in self-pity, you might be better off asking yourself why you hate your job and then focusing your efforts on ways to make your current work circumstances more tolerable.

Common Reasons for Job Dissatisfaction

Although every situation is different, there are several common causes of job dissatisfaction – each of which can be remedied with a little patience and effort.

  1.  I’m overworked. In an era of budget cuts and workforce reductions, it’s not unusual for employees to feel like they are working harder or longer than ever before. But in some cases, individual employees feel as though as they are carrying more than their fair share of the workload. If that’s you, you need to have a conversation with your supervisor ASAP. It’s likely that your employer doesn’t realize how much work you have on your plate and will be willing to downsize your responsibilities to keep you in the company.
  2.  My pay is too low. It’s safe to assume that you’re not the only person in the company who feels underpaid. Nearly all salary and hourly wage employees feel like they are undercompensated for their efforts. But if you really believe that your compensation is below what is should be, do your research and go into your next performance review with solid numbers that show why your pay level is out of line with the marketplace.
  3.  I feel unappreciated. For many people, on-the-job recognition is just as important as salary and benefits. Although it’s unreasonable to expect a “gold star” for doing everyday tasks, it’s normal to expect your employer to recognize your value to the company and to verbally reward you for going above and beyond the call of duty. If that isn’t happening, it’s worth broaching the topic with your employer – but the trick is to do it in a way that doesn’t sound petty. It can also help to model the behavior by consistently recognizing instances of outstanding job performance in your coworkers or fellow team members.
  4.  I have no career path. Your employer has a vested interest in your professional development and in helping you create a viable career path. But in most workplaces, employees themselves are expected to drive professional or career development activities. Annual or semi-annual performance reviews offer perfect venues for discussing your career objectives and to identify training events or other opportunities that will help you achieve your goals.
  5.  I hate my boss. Bad bosses are a fact of life and unfortunately there may be little you can do to escape the wrath of a truly despotic or incapable supervisor. But if your boss really is as bad as you think he is, then it’s only a matter of time before company executives take notice and send him packing … hopefully.

 

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